Federal or secondary cooperatives

In some cases, cooperative societies find it advantageous to form cooperative federations in which all of the members are themselves cooperatives. Historically, these have predominantly come in the form of cooperative wholesale societies, and cooperative unions.[36] Cooperative federations are a means through which cooperative societies can fulfill the sixth Rochdale Principle, cooperation among cooperatives, with the ICA noting that "Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures."[37] See also: List of Co-operative Federations [edit]Cooperative wholesale society Main article: Cooperative wholesale society According to cooperative economist Charles Gide, the aim of a cooperative wholesale society is to arrange bulk purchases, and, if possible, organise production.[36] The best historical example of this were the English CWS and the Scottish CWS, which were the forerunners to the modern Co-operative Group.[citation needed] [edit]Cooperative union Main article: Cooperative union A second common form of cooperative federation is a cooperative union, whose objective (according to Gide) is to develop the spirit of solidarity among societies and... in a word, to exercise the functions of a government whose authority, it is needless to say, is purely moral.[36] Co-operatives UK and the International Cooperative Alliance are examples of such arrangements.[citation needed] [edit]Cooperative political movements In s me countries with a strong cooperative sector, such as the UK, cooperatives may find it advantageous to form political groupings to represent their interests. The British Cooperative Party, the Canadian Cooperative Commonwealth Federation and United Farmers of Alberta are prime examples of such arrangements.[citation needed] The British cooperative movement formed the Cooperative Party in the early 20th century to represent members of consumers' cooperatives in Parliament, which was the first of its kind. The Cooperative Party now has a permanent electoral pact with the Labour Party meaning someone cannot be a member if they support a party other than Labour. An alternative grouping, the Conservative Co-operative Movement is open to people of all parties or none. UK cooperatives retain a significant market share in food retail, insurance, banking, funeral services, and the travel industry in many parts of the country. A co-operative federation or secondary co-operative is a co-operative in which all members are, in turn, co-operatives.[1] Historically, co-operative federations have predominantly come in the form of co-operative wholesale societies and co-operative unions.[2] Co-operative federations are a means through which co-operatives can fulfill the sixth Co-operative Principle, co-operation among co-operatives. The International Co-operative Alliance notes that Co-operatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the co-operative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.

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